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Any Tom Wood's drive shaft is fully greased before we ship it out. So initially, all you need to do is install it. Down the road however you will need to grease your drive shaft to ensure a long life. A good guideline to start with is to grease your shaft every oil change. If you go wheeling and drive through a lot of dirt or water, grease your shaft as soon as you get home. This will flush out the contaminants before they have a chance to do much harm. Any grease will do but generally we recommend a...

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More specifically people will ask "How much of the blue should be showing?". The blue doesn't matter, it doesn't always start in the same spot so you should really be looking at how much spline is showing. The answer though depends on the type of spline you have. For Tom Wood's drive shafts there are mainly two types of spline; the S spline and the X spline. If you have the S spline, there should be about 1.5" of the smooth bar showing. For the X spline, there should be about 2.5" of the cut spline showing. As long as...

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In the past few years, this has been become quite a hot topic for debate. I'll get to the bottom line first, then explain the basis for my opinion.  Bottom line on strength: The non-greaseable joint is slightly stronger than a greaseable joint. The exact number, how much stronger, is unknown and we do not believe it to be very significant.  Bottom line on wear life: A regularly greased greaseable joint will outlive a non-greaseable joint. But a non-greaseable joint will outlive a greaseable joint that does not get greased properly.  Now I will elaborate. We have asked two of the major...

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There are a number of reasons you might be having repeated problems with drive shafts or u-joints. One is that your drive shaft and the shaft's components are just too small for the application. If you've got a Jeep with an LS motor, Dana 60s, and 42 inch tires but you're still running the stock size joints in your drive shaft, it is time to upgrade to something bigger.  Another common problem is over-flexing and binding. This could be because you have a lot of lift and the shaft is running at too steep of an angle under full suspension...

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Size and strength. The 1310 series joint is what you would expect to find stock in most Jeep or small trucks. A 1350 series joint/shaft is what you might find in many full size trucks. While it's not 100% accurate, you could say that a 1310 is a "half ton" joint and a 1350 is a "one ton joint".  Get a more detailed explanation by clicking here.  

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